Tar Heel Editors Speak Out

The terrorists who turned a recent night on the town in London into a bloody crime scene might have left a wake of dead and wounded behind, but they obviously have not dampened the spirit of the people who live in that great city.

London, if you recall, did not break under the relentless bombing by Nazi Germany during World War II, and it will take more than a handful of murdering thugs to frighten its inhabitants into submission.

There is no more assuring phrase than the old British slogan “Keep calm and carry on.” That is exactly what the British people have always done and always will do. …

London will recover. Remember, yes. But recover.

— The Goldsboro News-Argus

A state lawmaker’s personal grudge against the newspaper industry could end up hurting workers. …

Sen. Trudy Wade, R-Guilford, filed a March 28 bill that would classify newspaper carriers as employees rather than independent contractors. Her legislation failed to advance, but Wade succeeded in modifying House Bill 205, which sought to extend workers’ compensation benefits to certain inmates, to include her provision for delivery personnel. …

Wade isn’t simply uninformed or misguided on newspaper carriers’ job description. She’s a shrewd politician with an ax to grind against the free and independent press. For several years, she’s spearheaded bills to take public notices out of newspapers and allow city and county governments to hide them on little-used websites. …

— The Wilson Times

When North Carolina prison officers weren’t gratuitously beating inmates … they were selling them drugs, letting them carry out gang attacks or colluding with them on other crimes. And when they weren’t doing any of that, they were having sex with them on the superintendent’s desk.

Those were among the findings and credible allegations uncovered by a team of Charlotte Observer investigative reporters who spent more than two years digging into corruption in the North Carolina prison system. The breadth and severity of misdeeds — by inmates, by prison officers and by supervisors — were breathtaking and demand a dramatic response. …

This was not one or two rogue employees; it was a culture deeply ingrained at prisons throughout the state. …

Employees routinely smuggle in drugs, cellphones and other contraband. One prisoner in solitary confinement used one of those phones to orchestrate a murder plot against a prosecutor’s father. …

This is a disgrace — and a danger not just to inmates and prison officials, but the public. Policymakers should reform the broken prison system right away. …

— The Charlotte Observer

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