Greet each day as a blessing

By KIM LAMBERT
Posted 3/15/22

Many folks gather together each Sunday for lunch following area church services. Do we, as Americans, take such blessings for granted?

My mind quickly races to the horrific images of the innocent, …

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Greet each day as a blessing

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Many folks gather together each Sunday for lunch following area church services. Do we, as Americans, take such blessings for granted?

My mind quickly races to the horrific images of the innocent, helpless Ukrainians who have been forcibly removed from their homeland.

At last check, more than 2.1 million Ukrainian refugees have fled in the wake of Russia’s military attack. In the weeks following Putin’s declaration of war, the Ukrainian cities have come under siege — effecting a mass exodus to neighboring countries whose leaders have waived their strict immigration legislation to allow passage of those refugees.

As we see the telecasts each evening, we are likely discounting all the many blessings that our nation has been bestowed. In our quest for career advancement, fame or success, we have likely become blindsided by our own personal goals and ambitions.

It seems we Americans oftentimes seek things we “want” versus appreciating all of those hidden blessings we may have taken for granted.

Recent statistics claim that there are currently 1.6 billion people across the globe who are classified as homeless. In fact, the World Health Organization surmises that 820 million folks globally do not even have an ample food supply on a daily basis. Now that is sad.

Our pastor recently told us congregants a sad, yet ironic account of an Oregon resident who’d been living on the streets for five years. Cathy Boone — a 49-year-old mother of two — succumbed to illnesses contracted from living in the elements near a homeless shelter in Astoria, Oregon.

What was so tragic is that her mom, Patricia Lupton, had died unexpectedly. Unbeknownst to Cathy, however, Patricia had left her entire estate — nearly $1 million — to Cathy. That money to rescue Cathy from despair could have been just a phone call away.

According to news outlets, court officials and family members attempted to locate Cathy for some time to no avail. She had relapsed — having apparently returned to a life mired by addictions and homelessness.

The Spithills even hired a private investigator to find Cathy’s whereabouts. When all of their leads were exhausted, a Clatsop County judge ordered Patricia’s large estate to be dispersed, instead, to Cathy’s two biological kids who were contingent beneficiaries.

It is quite unfortunate that citizens, whether they are homeless or have fallen victim to crime or addictions, do not have adequate resources for a healthy lifestyle. It is disheartening to hear that folks are forced to seek refuge on frigid cold pavements, creating makeshift camps underneath bridges or ravines or inside public parks.

We continually witness citizens being uprooted from their homeland by an evil dictator, our thoughts and prayers are with those helpless refugees.

May we, as Americans, greet each new day as a blessing — never taking our resources, our religious and personal freedoms for granted.

 

Kim Lambert is a former reporter with The Daily Record and former editor of The Angier Independent.

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